Cesario Alves
books and other subjects

 

(…) Photography is a system of visual editing. At bottom, it is a matter of surrounding with a frame a portion of one’s cone of vision, while standing in the right place at the right time. Like chess, or writing, it is a matter of choosing from among given possibilities, but in the case of photography the number of possibilities is not finite but infinite. The world now contains more photographs than bricks, and they are, astonishingly, all different. Even the most servile of photographers has not yet managed to duplicate exactly an earlier work by a great and revered master. The reader can demonstrate the point by clicking off a roll with the family Instamatic or Leica without moving from his chair: point the machine at random this way and that, quickly and without thought. When the film is developed every frame will define a subject different from any defined before. To make matters worse, some of the pictures are likely to be marginally interesting. Even the automatic cameras that record the comings and goings in banks describe facts and relationships that surprise mere eye-witnesses. (…)
 
Introduction to William Eggleston’s Guide (book and show at the MOMA, New York) by John Szarkowski, 1976

 

full text can be found here:

www.egglestontrust.com/

 

 

 

 

 

(…)
Feldmann is a connoisseur of the most ephemeral private moments. He has made “Pictures of car radios while good music was playing”, a project stretching from the 1970s to the ‘90s, and in the ‘70s also took many pictures of telephones after he used them to speak to his girlfriend. Like the pieces devoted to the image spectacle, these works explore the relation between image and caption. Their economy of means makes their effect more poetic and affecting. They provoke
us to make sense of the boundaries between the private and public, and help us begin to order the cacophony of images.
(…)
 
Roy Arden on Hans_Peter Feldmann (2006):

http://www.royarden.com/media/ardentexts/arden_feldmann.pdf